Share this post

user icon

Live

People Reading

This story now

This Explains Why Beaches Are Of Different Colors Around The World

Typically, people think of white sand when they think about the ideal beach. However, not every beach has coconut trees, volleyball games, and pristine, white sand. There's a black sand beach in Iceland, and some of the sand in Hawaii can turn red. So, how does one explain these differences?

For now, what we should understand is the basic fact about sand: it's primarily composed of coral and rock which have been barraged again and again by strong waves crashing down onto them. Thus, each grain of sand -- measuring less than an inch -- is the outcome of a natural activity that can take thousands of years.

Via


Don't forget to like our Facebook and Twitter for more informative posts!

This Explains Why Beaches Are Of Different Colors Around The World

This Explains Why Beaches Are Of Different Colors Around The World

754 396
  in OMG!

Hawaii's Black Sand

Hawaii's Black Sand

Research by the Geology Department of the University of Georgia declared that the sand here is black because it originally came from volcanic rock.

Close-Up of Sand From Maui

Close-Up of Sand From Maui

Likewise, the black sand can change its color. As seen from this sample, they can turn into a red, albeit, rusty color once they undergo the process of oxidation.

White Sand from Bermuda

White Sand from Bermuda

Here, the sand is mostly white because it's composed of calcium carbonate; that's right -- the same material our bones have. Yep, gorgeous white sand is made up of dead organisms. Thus, these sands are actually a collection of grounded marine animals, such as starfish, snails, and clam shells -- all combined with coral and algae.

Morocco Beach Sand

Morocco Beach Sand

Orange sand, like this one found near Casablanca, consists of fragments of molusk shells.

Antarctic Sand

Antarctic Sand

The first thing you would notice about sand from Antarctica is how they are relatively larger than the previous one we've seen. The next observation is that it is not white. The beaches located in glacial regions are actually much younger than those in tropical areas, meaning they haven't experienced the same barrage of crashing waves to pulverize them further. In addition, white isn't apparent here because of the lack of the mineral quartz.

Sand from Virginia's Chesapeake Bay

Sand from Virginia's Chesapeake Bay

Light-brown -- this is the sand color we are most familiar with. Mostly made up of quartz, the reason why it isn't white is the same as why the black sand in Maui turned rusty red -- through oxidation.

Loved this? Spread it out then

comments Comment ()

Post as @guest useror
clear

clear
arrow_back

redo Pooja query_builder {{childComment.timeAgo}}

clear

clear
arrow_back

Be the first to comment on this story.

Report

close

Select you are Reporting

expand_more
  • +2351 Active user
Post as @guest useror

NSFW Content Ahead

To access this content, confirm your age by signing up.