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Newly Discovered Himalayan "Noseless" Monkey Can Sneeze!

The animal kingdom does not have any issues of scarcity when it comes to weird looks and abilities, and we haven't even discovered all of the animals in the world, extinct or not. Last Monday, October 5, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) released a report called Hidden Himalayas: Asia's Wonderland which identified over 200 species, more than half of which were plants. They were all discovered between 2009 and 2014, and one of the oddities found is this certain monkey.

The black and white monkey, seemingly noseless but technically not, was initially discovered by hunters in Myanmar's Kachin region. One surprising characteristic, especially for an animal who doesn't seem to have a nose, is that it sneezes. In fact, it was noted that they can be easily tracked during the rain as they continuously sneeze.

Likewise, it's called the Snub-nosed Monkey.

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Newly Discovered Himalayan "Noseless" Monkey Can Sneeze!

Newly Discovered Himalayan "Noseless" Monkey Can Sneeze!

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I May Be "Noseless" But I Have Gorgeous Lips

I May Be "Noseless" But I Have Gorgeous Lips

This is a female. Nicknamed "Snubby" by conservationists, they live in the foothills of the Himalayan region. To be more precise, they can be found between 3,000 and 4,500 meters above sea level.

The First Live Sightings

The First Live Sightings

These first photographs were taken by conservationists from Flora & Fauna International (FFI).

Eating Bamboo

Eating Bamboo

This photo confirmed that not only were the monkeys going down to eat bamboo, it also revealed that they were actively reproducing -- a good sign for the survival of the species.

Mother and Baby

Mother and Baby

The reason why these "noseless" monkeys sneeze so much during the rain is because their upturned noses unintentionally catch water.

Caught in the Camera Trap

Caught in the Camera Trap

FFI's Frank Momberg noted that there are only probably 300 snub-nosed monkeys left. Even if the jungle they live in is lush, a nearby logging activity for valuable trees is taking place. An indirect and deadly effect is that loggers will pave the way for the construction of roads that the hunters can then utilize to go easily to these natural areas.

Check Out My Bangs

Check Out My Bangs

According to the FFI, snub-nosed monkeys are threatened by the locals since they are hunted for food, although now the people seem to take pride with the positive attention they are getting. Likewise, the conservation group will be providing development grants to villages who will preserve the monkeys and their habitat.

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