6 Strong Connections of Modern Day Technology and Hindu Literature 

Biotechnology and mythology - strong connection.

6 Strong Connections of Modern Day Technology and Hindu Literature 
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It is by and large human nature not to value things you already have but to run for things that aren't yours. Same applies to our traditions and mythological treasure.

We usually dismiss Vedas, Puranas and other Hindu texts considering them as stories or fiction.

We fail to acknowledge the fact that these contain shreds of evidence which could and possibly are the precursor to many modern scientific phenomena.

Dashavatar, 10 forms of Lord Vishnu, is, in essence, the theory of evolution which was propounded by Darwin centuries later. Ancient Indian Science has proved its glory too.

Read on to witness the biotechnological breakthroughs that were already invented by Hindu Gods.

#1. Surrogacy - The birth of Balarama.

#1. Surrogacy - The birth of Balarama.

Bhagavata Purana, written around 3100 BCE describes an incident when Kansa killed all the earlier six fetuses of Devaki, the wife of Vasudeva, then at the seventh time of pregnancy, Shesha (the serpent of Lord Vishnu) came into Devaki's womb. Vishnu sought the help of Yogamaya to transfer the fetus of Devaki and place it in the womb of Rohini (another wife of Vasudeva who then resided in the house of Nanda in Gokul), to save it from Kansa. The world knows him as Lord Balarama.

In modern times, the first test tube baby was born in the year 1978, although the idea was conceptualised in the 1930s. 

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#2. Human Cloning - Birth of Kauravas.

#2. Human Cloning - Birth of Kauravas.
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Mahabharata states that Gandhari, mother of the Kauravas, produced a mass of flesh after carrying the fetus for two years in her womb. Maharishi Vyasa then cut this mass of flesh into 100 parts, treated it with herbs and ghee and put it in 100 different jars. 100 children thereafter emerged from those jars known as Kauravas.

Rings a bell about stem cell technology and human cloning?

#3. Xeno transplant: Ganesha's head. 

#3. Xeno transplant: Ganesha’s head. 
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A Xeno transplant is a transplant between species. Transplanted organs are called grafts, hence a xenograft is an organ transplanted from one species to another. 

Xeno-transplants of the head are unlikely to be used and can be only be confined to mythological stories such as that of Lord Ganesha and Daksha.

The barrier that defines a species is whether reproduction is possible. A dog and a pig cannot mate and successfully produce offspring, therefore they are a different species and a transplant from one to the other would be called a Xenotransplant. 

#4. Cell regeneration. 

#4. Cell regeneration. 
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Hindu mythology is full of stories of regeneration of the body parts. Whenever a God or a demon had his hands or legs chopped off, they could instantly grow them.

In modern biology, scientists are attempting to regenerate cells in humans, animals, and plants. The experiments have been successful in the latter two categories.

While instances of regeneration of cells and body parts are found throughout Hindu mythology but human cell regeneration in modern science is still in nascent stage.  

#5. Successful brain surgery.

#5. Successful brain surgery.
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Paleoanthropologist A R Sankhyan said that trepanation (the process of drilling holes in the damaged skull to remove shattered bits of bone from a fractured skull) was practiced in Bronze Age in India. 

Scientists have discovered the world's oldest-known case of a successful human brain surgery after unearthing a 4300-year-old skull from the site of an ancient civilization site. This discovery was done by the scientists from the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) who found evidence pointing this to be the oldest-known case of Trephination in the world meant to treat a skull injury. 

#6. Genetic Engineering - Birth of Veerbhadra.

#6. Genetic Engineering - Birth of Veerbhadra.
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The story of Veerbhadra, the terrifying form of Lord Shiva, conforms to the definition of genetic engineering. It is an example of how Shiva created something from his gene but with traits of his choice.

The story goes that when Sati's (Shiva's consort) father Daksha was conducting a Yagna (sacred sacrifice), he invited everybody except Shiva. Sati visited the Yagna despite Shiva's disapproval and was humiliated by her father. Unable to bear the insult, she set herself afire using her yogic powers. Angered by his beloved's death, Shiva plucked a lock of his hair and threw it on the ground from which sprung Veerbhadra, an avatar so terrifying that he destroyed everything in his path.

I am already sensing the feeling of pride in the air! It's time to validate the stories in our literature.

Hope you found it a useful. Stay tuned for more information. Till then all your suggestions and feedback are awaited at reeya@wittyfeed.com.

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