10 Things Every Indian Should Know About Their Currency Notes

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10 Things Every Indian Should Know About Their Currency Notes
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It's been almost a year since PM Narendra Modi announced demonetisation of ₹500 & ₹1000 notes (notebandi) which caught the citizens of India by surprise. The said banknotes of the Mahatma Gandhi series were thereby replaced by the new Mahatma Gandhi series banknotes – both issued by the Reserve Bank of India. The new series banknotes came in the denominations of ₹500 & ₹2000 which have been in circulation since 2016. Soon, 200 rupee note & 50 rupee note would also be seen in circulation.  

Many changes have been made in the new series, including colours, dimensions & descriptions which vary from denomination to denomination. For instance, the new notes come in magenta, stone grey, bright yellow & fluorescent blue colours. Whereas the old ones were in red, green, violet, orange & yellow. 

Read on to see how many of these you already knew!

1. Swachh Bharat Logo

1. Swachh Bharat Logo

On the new notes (₹2000, ₹500, ₹200 & ₹50), the logo of Swachh Bharat can be observed along with the slogan 'ek kadam swachhta ki or'. 

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2. Denominational Numeral In Devanagari Script

2. Denominational Numeral In Devanagari Script
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The numerals of the denomination of the new currency notes are being written in Devanagari script as well which wasn't the case in the notes issued before notebandi.

3. The image from where Mahatma Gandhi's portrait was taken

3. The image from where Mahatma Gandhi's portrait was taken
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The portrait of Baapu which is used on our currency notes is taken from this picture of him with Lord Frederick William Pethick-Lawrence shot in 1946 at Rashtrapati Bhawan (formerly known as Viceroy House). Although a mirror image was used in the currency notes issued before demonetisation, now the orientation has been reverted to that of the original image. 

4. Mangalyaan on ₹2000

4. Mangalyaan on ₹2000

On the backside of the ₹2000 notes, a motif of Mangalyaan or Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) can be observed which represents India's first interplanetary mission. The old ₹1000 notes represented the economy of India, an oil rig, grain harvesting combine, metallurgy, and a girl working on a computer.

5. Red fort on ₹500.

5. Red fort on ₹500.
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On the backside of the new ₹500 notes, an image of the Indian heritage site – the red fort (lal kila) located in New Delhi along with the Indian flag can be observed. Before demonetisation, ₹500 notes had a depiction of Salt March (Dandi March) which was an act of civil disobedience led by Mahatma Gandhi to protest British rule in India.

6. Sanchi stupa on ₹200

6. Sanchi stupa on ₹200
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On the backside of ₹200 notes, a motif of Sanchi Stupa can be observed which is one of the oldest stone structures in India. Sanchi is a Buddhist complex near Bhopal famous for its Great Stupa. In the old series, no notes of such denomination were issued. 

7. Hampi on ₹50 

7. Hampi on ₹50 
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On the backside of the ₹50 notes, a motif of Hampi with the chariot can be observed. Hampi is a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in Karnataka, India. The notes issued earlier had the motif of Parliament of India & are still in circulation.

8. Positioning of Ashoka pillar emblem, guarantee clause, RBI emblem, Mahatma Gandhi portrait

8. Positioning of Ashoka pillar emblem, guarantee clause, RBI emblem, Mahatma Gandhi portrait
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The positioning of various icons & texts has been changed in the new currency notes. A few have been listed below: 

• Ashoka pillar emblem has been shifted to the right.

• Guarantee clause & Governor's signature with Promise clause has been shifted to the right.

• RBI emblem has been moved to bring it in line with the guarantee clause.

• Mahatma Gandhi's portrait's orientation & relative position has also been changed.

• Language panel on the reverse side has been moved towards the center.

9. Number panel with numerals growing

9. Number panel with numerals growing
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Number panel can be seen with numeral size increasing on the top left side & bottom right side. This was not the case in the currency notes before issued pre-demonetisation.

10. Measures taken for the visually impaired

10. Measures taken for the visually impaired
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Measures had been taken for the visually impaired in the old currency notes as well as the new ones. Intaglio or raised printing of Ashoka pillar emblem, Mahatma Gandhi portrait is designed on the currency notes. Identification marks & bleed lines are also there which help distinguish the notes to those who are visually challenged. For example, 7 bleed lines on ₹2000, 5 on ₹500 and 4 on ₹200 notes. 

PS: Information taken from RBI's official website.

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