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13 Words That Can't Be Translated Converted Into Amazing Illustrations

There are number of words in English language than the average number of hair on a person's head. We do find the description of some feelings, acts or people difficult. It is then when explaining something, in a nutshell, becomes hard that we start feeling a strong need of one word instead of using long descriptions.

Languages other than English entirely solve this problem out. There are words that describe some unusual feelings, acts or people so perfectly that you would not believe their description could be possibly so easy. Just one word and there you go. These words keep you from framing those complicated explanatory sentences to elaborate a simple thing.
Marija Tiurina illustrates a few of them, and I am sure you would want to learn and use them often in your speech.

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13 Words That Can't Be Translated Converted Into Amazing Illustrations

13 Words That Can't Be Translated Converted Into Amazing Illustrations

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1. Cafune: Running fingers tenderly through someone's hair.

1. Cafune: Running fingers tenderly through someone's hair.

2. Age-Otori: To look weird just after a haircut.

2. Age-Otori: To look weird just after a haircut.

This Japanese word relates to the moment when the hairdresser messes up with your haircut and coloring and then asks if you brought a hat.

3. Schlimazl: A chronically unlucky individual.

3. Schlimazl: A chronically unlucky individual.

All of us have that one person in our circle who always gets stuck into some or the other problem. This Yiddish word is perfect to describe such friend.

4. Baku-shan: A girl who is beautiful only from her backside.

4. Baku-shan: A girl who is beautiful only from her backside.

Not all words are sweet and pleasant. Japanese word Baku-Shan, for an instance is a word that is harsh to be called by. It is used for a girl or a lady who is not so charming in the front but is superbly beautiful in the backside.

5. Duende: The mysterious power certain artwork holds to make a person deeply move.

5. Duende: The mysterious power certain artwork holds to make a person deeply move.

The Spanish word Duende refers to artwork that are influential enough to bring out waves of intense emotions in the viewer's mind and heart.

6. L'appel Duvide: An undeniable urge to jump from high places.

6. L’appel Duvide: An undeniable urge to jump from high places.

This is a French word which describes a child who is brave enough to perform acts such as parachuting out of a plane or other acts involving jumping from a high position.

7. Palegg: Anything and everything you can put on a slice of bread.

7. Palegg: Anything and everything you can put on a slice of bread.

Palegg is a Norwegian word which means anything that you can use as a topping on a slice of bread.

8. Tretar: The second refill, or "threefill"

8. Tretar: The second refill, or “threefill”

When no amount of coffee seems sufficient.

9. Tingo: The act of pretending to borrow lovely things from your friend's place and then keeping them for yourself.

9. Tingo: The act of pretending to borrow lovely things from your friend's place and then keeping them for yourself.

If you see any corner of your home getting empty on its own, check your circle for a Tingo!

10. Gufra: The amount of water your hands can hold.

10. Gufra: The amount of water your hands can hold.

Gufra is an Arabic word having different practical meanings for different people as a result of varied sizes of palms.

11. Schadenfreude: Feeling of pleasure from seeing someone else's misfortune.

11. Schadenfreude: Feeling of pleasure from seeing someone else’s misfortune.

You never want to be at the receiving end of this German word but you sure want to give it a try when someone else is experiencing misfortune.

12. Kyoikumama: A mother who relentlessly pushes her children toward academic success.

12. Kyoikumama: A mother who relentlessly pushes her children toward academic success.

Almost all Mommies around the world fit perfectly into the meaning of this Japanese word.

13. Torchlusspanik: The fear of decreasing opportunities as one grows older.

13. Torchlusspanik: The fear of decreasing opportunities as one grows older.

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