These Period Traditions From Around The World Will Change The Way You Look At It

In some places, menstruation is celebrated as half wedding.

These Period Traditions From Around The World Will Change The Way You Look At It
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Why am I not allowed to visit a temple when I bleed? Will the pickle really smell foul and unfit for consumption if I touch it while I am menstruating? Why do I have to eat and sit separately during 'that time of the month'? 

There are various questions that haunt a girl when she enters this phase of her life where the process of getting transformed into a woman begins for her. It is the time when the journey of womanhood is embarked and female becomes biologically fit to produce a child.

Various places around the world show different reactions to this natural phenomenon that all women experience for a major part of their lives. We have made a list of some unconventional, bizarre, supportive yet unknown facts and customs about periods that are definitely going to change the way people perceive it. 

Let's take a look. 

Will isolation solve the problem?

Will isolation solve the problem?

People of Rastafarian societies, Bali, Hindus in South India, and certain tribes in Nigeria, keep women in isolated and confined huts. This was done to keep the woman away from other members of the family and even her husband because a menstruating woman was considered "impure".

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Banished for bleeding 

Banished for bleeding 
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In Bali, Bangladesh and in Rastafarianism, a woman is not allowed to cook food or come in contact with anyone's food when she is bleeding. In fact, to safeguard the interest of the society and religious beliefs of people, women are not even allowed to visit temples during 'that time of the month'.

The story of a cultural bath 

The story of a cultural bath 
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In Bali and in Orthodox Judaism, after every cycle when a woman is done bleeding, she is supposed to perform a sacred bath called a mikveh.

People drink menstrual blood 

People drink menstrual blood 
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YES, they do. 

According to an article, People of Bauls, Bengal in India take up a ceremony in which a woman's first-period blood is mixed with cow's milk, coconut milk, camphor, and is drunk by those present at the event as a substance to regenerate energy, increase memory and grant happiness. 

This claim sounds too weird to be true but if actually is, we'd really not like to promote any such act.

Menarche is celebrated

Menarche is celebrated
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When a girl bleeds for the first time, there are certain groups in society that celebrate it with zeal and enthusiasm. A lavish spread of food and customary gifts are been given to mark the beginning of adulthood. 

Did you know about what happens in Karnataka? 

Did you know about what happens in Karnataka? 
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In Karnataka, the young girl who starts menstruating is dressed up like a bride and the neighbourhood aunties perform aarti and present her certain valuable stuff, the same is believed to take place in Andhra Pradesh and Kerala. 

Now, this is surprising 

Now, this is surprising 
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Among the Zulus of South Africa, A goat is slaughtered and the girl who started bleeding is secluded from her friends, she is bathed and smeared in clay. Bizarre, eh? 

This is what Nepali men think...

This is what Nepali men think...
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As per a BBC article, Dhamilekh, a village in Nepal, has a population of Hindus. They believe that if a woman touches you she has to undergo a religious ceremony to atone for accidentally touching a man, or polluting their environment.

People did this to keep evil at bay...

People did this to keep evil at bay...
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In South India, it is customary for women to keep a lemon or a piece of iron along with them, whenever bleeding. This is done to keep themselves away from any vulnerable evil spirit. 

Mixed thoughts 

Mixed thoughts 
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It is ironic yet surprising to note how different cultures deal with monthly cycle. People see this natural phenomenon as both, something frightening and empowering. 

That's all people. 

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You can also share your thoughts and feedback with me at muskan@wittyfeed.com