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10 Pictures That Show How Rains Flooded Kaziranga National Park  

Oh, what a deluge!   

10 Pictures That Show How Rains Flooded Kaziranga National Park  
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The Brahmaputra river that flows from China down to India has flooded its river banks after the relentless monsoon rains flooded the areas located along its banks in last two weeks.  

Along with villages, Kaziranga National Park, home to two third of world's one-horned Rhinoceros, was also inundated. According to a report by The Indian Express, more than 50 percent of the Kaziranga Park area is submerged. Elephants, rhinos and deer were shifted to safer locations. Many of them moved on their own to safer locations.   

There was more to the chaos. Most of the animals were hit by the vehicles in the floods trying to escape the deluged park. The count of the animals killed and washed away still remains undetermined.  

Let's look at the pictures of destruction that occurred in the past two weeks in Assam.    

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Endangered Rhinos.

Floods in Kaziranga national park

One-horned Rhinos were seen at the highlands during the floods in Kaziranga National Park. Over 70 percent of the park was submerged by the flood waters and the park authorities have flown over in drones to ensure the safety of animals.     

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Elephant escaping the floods.

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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Whenever floods strike, animals migrate to highlands inside the park to get to a safe place. According to reports, 8,82,315 animals and poultry across the state stand affected because of the heavy rains.  

Hog Deer swimming in the flood waters.

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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Hog deer from Kaziranga park can be seen escaping the tragedy by swimming in the flood waters. Floods have destroyed the biodiversity of about 2500 villages in Assam in last two weeks.  

Rescue for animals.

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) jointly run by wildlife care facility of Assam Forest Department and International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) rescued thirty-one hog deer, out of which sixteen were released back to the wild. Two seriously injured deer died during treatment and eight are under care at CWRC.    

Animals forced to move to Highlands.

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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Rhinos and several other animals including elephants moved to Highlands to be safe from floods, according to the eastern Assam wildlife division

Patrolling tower partially submerged. 

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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Patrolling officers were seen leaving for animal rescue and to see the conditions of the victims of floods from their inundated patrolling tower.    

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To avoid poaching!

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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A forest police guard was seen patrolling in a speed motor boat to look for the animals as the risk of poaching generally increases during floods.  

Forest guards patrolling.

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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Indian forest guards were seen patrolling during floods on a boat near Kaziranga National Park within 250 kms of the flood region.    

A makeshift raft for the escape.

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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A boy rows a makeshift raft outside his submerged home near the Kaziranga National Park in the northeastern state of Assam. 

Floods good for ecological balance?

Floods in Kaziranga national park
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The annual rains help to maintain the ecological balance of the forest. Although the floods are beneficial for the ecosystem of the forest, they bring trouble for animals. Rains wash away the unwanted weeds from the forest, which are considered good for the flora. The plants can grow well when unwanted weeds are washed off.  

That's all folks!  

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Do we need a better flood management system?