This Is What Happens When You Believe In Superstitions 

#10 is so true!

This Is What Happens When You Believe In Superstitions 
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Superstitions are as old as humans when people began to think that certain objects, natural occurrences, or animals bring good or bad luck and they have a connection with supernatural power.

Even in the present age of digital technology, superstitions prevail.

Here are 11 of the most common superstitions.

You may also read: 9 Superstitions About Moles That Exist Around The World


1. Black Cat Crossing Your Path

Black cat

Black cat, which is believed to be associated with witchcraft, is seen as omen of bad luck.

It is believed that if a black cat crosses your path, you will face disaster. Gamblers believe the same.

But people in Japan, Great Britain and Ireland believe that black cats bring good luck.

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2. Groundhog Day

2. Groundhog Day
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The superstition that the rodent can predict the weather seems popular in US and Canada. This superstition originated from Germany which later came to America. 

3. 666

A boy in grave yard
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Watched the film - The Omen? Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia - the term for the fear of number 666, known as the 'Number of the Beast'. This superstition originated from Christianity and the number means being a representative of satan in the Biblical Book of Revelations. 

4. Crossing Fingers

4. Crossing Fingers
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Crossing your fingers to wish for good luck is common practice around the world, though its origins are unclear. This is common in Christian countries, as it is seen as a 'sign of the cross'. 

Some say it is an old pagan gesture or a good luck superstition created during the "Hundred-Year War" between England and France.

5. Broken Mirrors

Broken Mirrors
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If you've broken a mirror, it will bring seven years of bad luck. This stems from the superstition that a mirror captures part of your soul. So, when a mirror breaks, part of your soul breaks too.

At some places, people cover mirrors in a house when someone dies. This is done so that soul can leave the building without getting trapped in the mirror.

6. Spilled Salt

6. Spilled Salt
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Spilling salt is considered a bad omen. It originated after Judas Iscariot spilled salt at the Last Supper shortly before he betrayed Jesus.

At some places, throwing a pinch of salt over one's left shoulder is said to bring good luck and ward off evil.

7. Walking Under Ladder

7. Walking Under Ladder
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Walking underneath a ladder brings bad luck. This has to do with the triangle that's formed by the act that represents the Christian Holy Trinity. 

8. Chain Letters

8. Chain Letters

Chain letters date back to 1888. It is still seen in email and social networks that asks people to pass on the message, warning of terrible fate if not forwarded. 

9. The Black Witch Moth

The Black Witch Moth
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The Black Witch moth is seen as an omen of death. It is believed that if a moth flies into the house of someone who is sick it means that his death is close. In Jamaica, it is thought to be a lost soul which brings bad luck. In central American cultures, all kinds of moths are associated with death.

10. The Number 13

10. The Number 13
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Numer 13 is considered unlucky across the globe. It is linked to Last Supper where Judas is said to have sat at the thirteenth place at the table. 'Friday, the 13th', dates back to 19th century and combines two old superstitions - the fear of the number 13 and Friday, which is considered unlucky. Fear of the number 13 is known as "triskaidekaphobia". 

11. Dead Man's Hand

11. Dead Man's Hand
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This is a pair of black eights, a pair of black aces, plus a fifth unspecified card. It is considered unlucky because these cards were held by Wild Bill Hickok, the 19th century US folk hero who was killed while playing poker in Deadwood in 1876. However, there's very little evidence about the cards he was holding.

Do you also believe in these superstitions?