Kids Crash Into Dad's BBC Live Interview, The Video Clip Goes Viral Within Minutes!

They should have rather received an innocent gesture.

Kids Crash Into Dad's BBC Live Interview, The Video Clip Goes Viral Within Minutes!
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A hilarious video of kids crashing into their father's BBC interview is going viral, and the internet has all sorts of opinion regarding the situation.

A political science professor at Pusan National University, Robert E. Kelly was offering his expert analysis on South Korean politics via Skype when his two young kids stormed in and stole the show. Kelly's first reaction was to nudge his daughter away from the screen instead of fully stopping the interview and lead her out of the room.

To this, the internet is torn on whether the father reacted appropriately or not.

Here comes the first child.

Here comes the first child.

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Who comes and stands just behind her father in front of the screen

Who comes and stands just behind her father in front of the screen
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And here comes the second child... toddlers are so innocent.

And here comes the second child... toddlers are so innocent.
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As soon as the lady behind realised about this blunder, she ran inside the room to collect the children and take them back.

As soon as the lady behind realised about this blunder, she ran inside the room to collect the children and take them back.
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Have a look at the full video here.

But the story doesn't end here. People have not just watched this video for entertainment but have come up with a variety of tweets. 

Initially, the tweets regarding the mishap were mainly positive.

Initially, the tweets regarding the mishap were mainly positive.

But it didn't last for long. People criticised Kelly for shooing away his daughter with his arm.

But it didn't last for long. People criticised Kelly for shooing away his daughter with his arm.

Interestingly, a debate popped up, questioning whether the lady is their mother or a nanny. It attracted the following tweet.

After the video became the internet sensation in just few hours, the BBC spokesperson shared, "We're really grateful to Professor Kelly for his professionalism. This just goes to show that live broadcasting isn't always child's play."

Should live broadcasting be done with an open door?