This Is How An All-Female Flight Crew Of The Royal Brunei Airlines Made History On Brunei's National Day of Freedom

An all-female flight crew land a plane where women aren't allowed to drive.

This Is How An All-Female Flight Crew Of The Royal Brunei Airlines Made History On Brunei's National Day of Freedom
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A trio of female flight attendants made history as an all-female flight crew of the Royal Brunei Airlines by landing a plane in Saudi Arabia. The women flew a Boeing 787 Dreamliner from Brunei to Jeddah on February 23rd.

Women's Rights are limited in Saudi Arabia, and comparatively, this was a huge step in their lives. They have shown women all over the globe that anything is possible and some hard work can take a person a long way. 

 

Soaring and Inspiring at the same time.

Soaring and Inspiring at the same time.

Captain Sharifa Czarena and senior first officers Sariana Nordin and Dk Nadiah pg Khashiem were pictured in the cockpit of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner before their inaugural flight on February 23rd, which is Brunei's National Day.

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People would normally see a pilot as a man's profession. This achievement proves to the younger generation and girls especially, that dreams do come true. 

Captain Czarena trained at the Cabair Flying School at Cranfield, Bedfordshire.

Captain Czarena trained at the Cabair Flying School at Cranfield, Bedfordshire.
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In 2012 Czarena made history by becoming the first female captain of a flag carrier airline in Southeast Asia, according to an article in the Brunei Times.

Smiles of opportunity!

Smiles of opportunity!
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While it was a great moment for the carrier, it was an even bigger moment because they landed in Saudi Arabia, a country where women aren't even allowed to drive cars. This moment also coincided with Brunei's National Day of Freedom. 

A land of sand and limited freedom for women.

A land of sand and limited freedom for women.
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In Saudi Arabia, women aren't allowed to drive cars and are completely dependent on their male companions to travel. Women would be fined or arrested if they were found behind a wheel. Imagine landing a plane in such a land, but not being able to drive anywhere from the airport. 


The Late King Abdullah allowed women to vote and before he died, he appointed 30 women to the country's top advisory Shura Council.

The Late King Abdullah allowed women to vote and before he died, he appointed 30 women to the country's top advisory Shura Council.
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Last year, women in Saudi Arabia cast their votes for the first time in municipal elections. A total of 978 women also registered as candidates. They were alongside 5,938 men and had to speak from behind a partition while campaigning or be represented by a man.

Voicing opinions and starting silent revolutions.

Voicing opinions and starting silent revolutions.
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Saudi women have joined a series of campaigns, even on social media, to demand an easing of the restrictions. They are creating milestones after milestones, slowly inspiring other females to voice their opinions and achieve anything. They are rising and asking for their rights. Behind those burkas and niqabs, there's nothing short of a revolution. 

Aren't these ladies brave?