Sikh-American Civil Rights Advocate Valarie Kaur's Plea In The Times Of Donald J. Trump (Video)

Breathe and push: A plea to her country!

Sikh-American Civil Rights Advocate Valarie Kaur's Plea In The Times Of Donald J. Trump (Video)
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Valarie Kaur, you might or might not be knowing her, so let's just take a short introduction about her and here we go. 

Valarie Kaur is a Sikh-American civil rights advocate, Sikh interfaith leader, a media and strategy fellow at the Stanford centre of internet and society and an American documentary filmmaker. Her grandfather followed seven generations before him, served in the military and fighting on the frontlines in World War 2 against Hitler armies. His British commander had requested him to remove his turban and he refused his orders saying the turban represented his faith and he could not serve without his faith. Apparently in the same war when the German aircraft swooped down and shot his best friend, he wiped off his wounds with the cloth of his turban and brought him back home. Because for a true Sikh, seva means leaving no one behind. 

Well, not enough of this, you gotta listen to her plea to her country in the time of President Donald J. Trump not in against of anybody but to oppose racism, inequality, injustice and immorality.

Let's check out the story here.

# Why did she become a lawyer?

# Why did she become a lawyer?

It is aptly said that to become someone you always aim to be like, you need to have the strongest will and belief in your own strengths and gut feelings. Valarie followed her heart and gut feelings. 

Valarie said in her recent speech about the real reason behind becoming a lawyer and an unstoppable activist?! She firmly added, "In the aftermath of 11th September, where hate violence exploded in the United States, where a man I called uncle, was brutally murdered. I tried to stand up. And I became a lawyer like a man who freed my grandfather and I joined a generation of activists fighting detentions, deportations, surveillance, special registrations, hate crimes, racial profiling and after 15 years every film, every lawsuit and every campaign, we were making the nation safer for the next generation. "

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# After listening to her voice against racism and inequality, throwbacks came both the ways.

# After listening to her voice against racism and inequality, throwbacks came both the ways.
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When someone takes a stand for human rights and values, apparently they have both after them: followers and haters. But, when the person says and follows the right things, their followers probably have comparatively a longer queue than their haters. So, go ahead lady! You have a long way to go. 

# And then my son was born.....

# And then my son was born.....
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She added emotionally, "On Christmas eve, I watched him ceremoniously put the milk and cookies by the fire for Santa Claus and after he went to sleep, I then drank the milk and ate the cookies. I wanted him to wake up and see them gone in the morning. I wanted him to believe in the world that was magical but I am leaving my son to the world that is more dangerous than the one I was given. I am raising, we are raising in America, a brown boy who may someday wear a turban as part of his faith. And in America today, as we enter an era of an enormous rage as white nationalists hail these moments at their great awakening as hate acts against Sikhs and Muslims brother and sisters are at an all-time high. I know that there will be moments when on the streets, on the schoolyards my son will be seen as foreign, as a suspect and as a terrorist."

# And she continued it with saying.....

# And she continued it with saying.....
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Just like "Black bodies are still seen as criminals, brown bodies are still seen as illegal, trans bodies are still seen as immoral, indigenous bodies are still seen as savage, the bodies of women and girls are still seen as someone else's property. When we see these bodies, not as brothers and sisters then it becomes easier to bully them, rape them, neglect them, incarcerate them." She seemed unstoppable with the dawn of her all in-depth emotions. 

# The future is dark....

# The future is dark....
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''I close my eyes and I see the darkness of my grandfather's cell and I can feel the spirit of ever-rising optimism in the Sikh tradition Chardi Kala within him. So the mother in me asks what if this darkness is not the darkness of the tomb, but the darkness of the womb?! What if our America is not dead but for the country that is waiting to be born. The story of America is one long labour. What if our grand fathers and grand mothers are standing behind us now? For those who survived occupation, genocide, slavery, jim crow, detentions and political assaults. What if they are whispering in our ears today, tonight that you are brave. And what if it is our nations great transition?''

*And a big round of applause was heard*


# What does the midwife tell us to do?

# What does the midwife tell us to do?
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"Breathe and then? push"

According to her, because we don't push we will die. If we don't push our nation will die. Tonight we will breathe, tomorrow we will labour in love, through love and your revolutionary love is the magic that we will show to our children.

# Watch her video for pushing your beliefs towards the new era of beginning and equality for all.

"Waheguruji ka khalsa, waheguruji ki fateh".

Did she make sense to you?