This National Park Shoots Poachers To Protect Rhinos, And Have Already Killed 50 Poachers So Far

This strategy has helped so far, but is it time to stop?

This National Park Shoots Poachers To Protect Rhinos, And Have Already Killed 50 Poachers So Far
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The Kaziranga National Park in India is famed for its rhino population and has been so for a very long time. It is home to the one-horned Indian rhinos, which can't be found anywhere else on the planet. However, there was a time when these majestic, muscular creatures faced the danger of extinction. Poachers used to, and even today try to, kill rhinos so that they can land a rhino horn in their hands. The rhino's horn is a very precious commodity and sells for about $6000 per 100 grammes, and that makes rhinos the target of poachers. In fact, the menace of poachers had reached such a  stage that at one time, there were only a handful of these rhinos left. however, Kaziranga successfully handled the situation and today, the park hosts over 2,400 rhinos. The success story of Kaziranga is truly worth emulating if seen only from the outside. It's only when the strategy behind the rise in rhino population is seen that certain concerns emerge. Scroll down to know the whole story.

The Kaziranga National Park has seen tremendous success in its rhino conservation project.

The Kaziranga National Park has seen tremendous success in its rhino conservation project.

However, their strategy is a bit concerning.

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The park shoots poachers in order to save the rhinos.

The park shoots poachers in order to save the rhinos.
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Until now, about 50 people have been killed in the process.

There was a time when there were only a handful of one-horned rhinos left.

There was a time when there were only a handful of one-horned rhinos left.
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And this explains the need for the park to go for such an extreme measure to save its rhinos.

Now, however, the situation is different.

Now, however, the situation is different.
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Today, the park hosts over 2,400 rhinos, and it accounts for two-thirds of the world's population of rhinos.

So this begs the question: is it time to stop?

So this begs the question: is it time to stop?
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There's no doubt that this strategy also poses the risk of innocent people getting killed.

But, why exactly are rhinos hunted down?

But, why exactly are rhinos hunted down?
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Rhino poachers are always after their horns, as they sell for $6000 per 100g.

Rhino horns are marketed as a miracle cure.

Rhino horns are marketed as a miracle cure.
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They are said to cure everything, from cancer to erectile dysfunction.

Poachers, even today, are trying to get their hands on rhinos.

Poachers, even today, are trying to get their hands on rhinos.
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And that means that rhinos still need our protection.

But this strategy of killing poachers hands a dangerous weapon to the workers' hands.

But this strategy of killing poachers hands a dangerous weapon to the workers' hands.
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And that weapon is the freedom for them to shoot anybody and then get away with impunity by claiming that the shot person was a poacher.

And so we ask again, do we really need this practice to still continue?

And so we ask again, do we really need this practice to still continue?
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Well, it'd simply be wrong to risk the lives of innocents by continuing this extreme strategy, even when there is no need to anymore.

Do you agree with with what they're doing?