9 Technologies That Placed Cricket Higher Than Ever

It's hard to imagine cricket without technology. 

9 Technologies That Placed Cricket Higher Than Ever
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Isn't watching cricket one of the best technological experiences of all time? Cricket isn't merely a game any longer. It's a great exhibition of technological advancements that we achieved over time.

Osman Samiuddin once said, "Cricket's toes are partially dipped into the ocean of science and there is a great wave approaching". Rightly so, the waves are approaching and the Cricket is going to get more than its toes wet.

Technology evolved a lot and gave us no hint where it escorted us to. But while we sit there to witness our favourite game of Cricket, we do get some clues. The 200-year-old game has used technology to the best, and we would be utterly amazed to look at how these changes heap additional fascination to it.

Here are the highest game changers for the game of cricket. They aren't Virat Kohli or David Warner, but the technologies that turned it upside down and opened it inside out.

The Snickometer

The Snickometer

An extremely sensitive microphone(Snicko) fixed near the stumps can hit the gaps that were earlier missed. The technology uses slow motion videos and recorded sound waves simultaneously to detect any fine edge of the bat on the ball that human eyes might miss.

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The Hawk Eye

The Hawk Eye
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A boon to eradicate the human errors in LBW decisions. The technology predicts the course of the ball once the ball hits a batsman's bat, pad, or body. Multiple cameras together show quite a clear picture about how the ball would have traveled further if not stopped by the impact.

The Hotspot

The Hotspot
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The HotSpot checks whether the batsman has touched the ball with his bat or not. The technology is based on the heat signatures of the impact using infrared cameras. Wherever the ball hits, the heat signature generated is seen as the HotSpot.

The Slo Mo Cams

The Slo Mo Cams
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Because that's how you know the split second's difference between a player's arrival into the crease and a fielder blowing the bails away. No Slow Motion Cameras, no replays. High-speed cameras are employed to recreate a scene frame by frame in ultra slow motion.

The Speed Gun

The Speed Gun
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Speed Gun is the reason we respect Shoaib Akhtar to be the fastest bowler in the world and Sachin Tendulkar for smashing those balls out of the park. The gadget helps in predicting the speeds of the balls bowled by the bowlers.

The LED Stumps and Bails

The LED Stumps and Bails
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Bronte EcKermann did wonders by bringing up this technology. The special LED stumps and bails are now helping a lot. As soon as the ball hits the bails or the stumps, they start glowing. Thus one would quickly know the exact second that ball hits the stumps or bails. The bails are equipped with a microprocessor and sensor and a low voltage battery. The time of wicket breaking can be known in a 1000th fraction of a second.

The Ball Spin RPM

The Ball Spin RPM
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This technology is to measure the skills of a spin bowler. The technology uses a counter to measure the revolutions per minute rate of ball spin after release. It also measures the amount of spin of the ball after pitching.

The Spider Cam

The Spider Cam
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Spider Cams in cricket came with ICL, followed by the semifinals of 2010 IPL, and in Champions League T20 in South Africa. Motorized winches at corners control the Kevlar Cables connected to a gyro-stabilised camera-carrier or a dolly. This doll makes the camera cover all the happenings of the ground providing an innovating viewing experience to the spectators.

The CricFlex

The CricFlex
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Not yet in for use but the technology is going to make the game stricter for the bowlers. It's a wearable sleeve with various motion sensors that would tell the exact angle of the flex of a bowler's arm. Readings are received by an app on a mobile or a computer immediately after a bowler has delivered. You cannot chuck anymore.


So what do you think is the biggest pathbreaker technology for the game of cricket?

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