10 Odd Cases Of Children Being Raised By Wild Animals

#5 Sounds like it's straight out of a horror movie!

10 Odd Cases Of Children Being Raised By Wild Animals
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Everyone loves to live on the wild side. And let's face, it all of us can get a little wild sometimes. Most children are born wild, right? Well in these cases, we look at children who took the wild side to a new extreme. Here are Ten Odd Cases Of Children being Raised By Wild Animals.

Marina Chapman.

Marina Chapman.

In her book  "The Girl With No Name," author and survivor Marina Chapman describes the story of how she was kidnapped from her home village in Columbia in 1954 and was abandoned in the jungle at the age of just five years old! For the next five years, Chapman supposedly survived by observing the habits and eating the food dropped by Capuchin monkeys. Chapman was eventually rescued by hunters and currently resides in England.


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The Curious Case Of Kaspar Hauser.

The Curious Case Of Kaspar Hauser.
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In 1828,  a teenage boy wandered into the streets of Nuremberg, Germany and told the local police that he was kidnapped and held captive in a room for an extended period. He was able to identify himself with the name Kaspar Hauser. The boy was taken in and tutored by a schoolmaster. The end of Kaspar's story proves to be as strange as his origin. In 1833, before dying of his wounds, he claimed that a stranger had given him a bag containing a cryptic note and had stabbed him in the chest. To this day, the strange mystery of Kaspar Hauser remains unsolved.


Dina Sanichar.

Dina Sanichar.
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Dina Sanichar was found in the Bulandshahr region of India. He was found along with wolves in a cave. Initially, the hunters mistook him for an animal. After realizing the reality of the strange six-year-old boy's existence, the hunters took him to an orphanage in Agra. However, Sanichar found it impossible to adjust to human society. He preferred raw meat and bones over cooked food. Eventually, Sanichar died in 1895. 


Peter The Wild.

Peter The Wild.
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Found in the Hertswold forest of northern Germany in 1725," Peter," the wild boy who appeared to be around the age of 12, was filthy and walked on all fours. After spending some time in a correctional institution, he was taken to George, The Duke of Hanover. Initially, the Duke took a liking to the boy and tried to feed him and clothe him. The Duke even named him Peter. However, he gave up due to the boy's lack of manners. Peter was taken to the countryside to live out his days in obscurity. He died at the age of 72 never learning to speak more than two words.


Wolf Girl Of Devil's River.

Wolf Girl Of Devil's River.
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In 1835, local John Dent and his heavily pregnant wife at the time Molly Dent were passing through a part of Texas known as The Devil's River. In the midst of a fierce storm, Mrs. Dent went into labor. When Mr. Dent went in search of help, he was struck by lightning. Rescuers later found that Mrs. Dent had died giving birth. However, the baby was nowhere to be found. Since wolf prints surrounded the site, no proper search was conducted. Ten years later, a boy supposedly saw a girl traveling with a wolf pack, hunting and eating livestock with them. However, most of these stories resemble campfire tales.


Wolf Children.

Wolf Children.
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Probably one of the most famous stories on this list. At the end of WWII, German orphans were known as "wolf children." This was because of their wild wolf-like behavior wandering around the areas of Poland and the Soviet Union and in the wilderness. Hundreds of wolf children roamed the woods and roads of Prussia, having been orphaned as a result of the War in 1945. Most of these kids died because of the climatic conditions as well as hunger. However, some survived due to sympathetic locals who took them in and looked after them.

 

The Leopard Boy.

The Leopard Boy.
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Found in the recordings of British ornithologist and police officer E.C. Stuart Baker, the story of The Leopard Boy is one of the most compelling stories you'll ever encounter! In the recordings, a scenario is described in which Stuart was overlooking the work of laborers mending a road near the village of Dhunghi. A man approached Stuart claiming that if he worked, no one would be able to look after his son, who would run back to the jungle. The man then showed Stuart his son, a boy who squatted on all fours and who appeared to have cataracts on his eyes. According to the story, the boy had been stolen by a leopard when he was still an infant and assumed dead. Three years later, the boy was found with the leopard's cubs when the animal was killed. 



Amala and Kamala.

Amala and Kamala.
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In 1921, in the jungles of Midnapore, a missionary named Rev. Joseph Singh first discovered the girls Amala and Kamala, who were around eight and ten in a wolf den. The girls were taken to an orphanage but showed no interest in human interaction and walked around on all fours. The girls did not survive for long. Amala died within a year and Kamala within five. They did learn to speak around 50 words before they perished. There are speculations that these stories were fabricated to raise funds for Rev. Singh's orphanage.


John of Liege.

John of Liege.
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Sir Kenelm Digby was the first man to document the story of John of Liege in 1644. Digby described a 21-year-old man who was caught trying to steal food from a farm. The man had initially fled to the forest to escape the Civil War and never returned to human civilization. The man supposedly survived eating off many berries and edible roots in the woods.



Memmie Le Blanc.

Memmie Le Blanc.
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Popularly known as the "Savage Girl of Champagne," Memmie Le Blanc first appeared in the village of Songi, France. According to the story, a villager tried to scare her back into the woods by setting a large dog on her which Memmie killed with one blow using a club that she carried. She was finally captured and taken to Viscount d'Epinoy. The Viscount was fascinated by the girl as she tore through the carcass of an unskinned rabbit his cook was preparing. In 1731, the girl was sent to a nearby hospital to be educated and baptized. Over the next ten years, Memmie learned French and was subject to a contemporary biography that described her arrival to France. 

Did you read the book “The Girl With No Name”, by Marina Chapman?