7 Completely Different New Year Eve Celebrations Around The World

And we always thought that it is Dec 31.

7 Completely Different New Year Eve Celebrations Around The World
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New Year's Day and New Year's Eve are symbolized in various different ways across the world. You all might consider, January 1 as New Year's Day, as the beginning of the New Year, according to the Gregorian Calendar we usually follow. But you might not know that not in every tradition or culture, Jan 1 is marked as New Year's day. 

Yes, New Year is celebrated on other different dates as per different regions and traditions. So, here's a look at the various celebrations from Chinese New Year to Thai and Balinese New Year.

According to western culture, New Year is observed on December 31.

According to western culture, New Year is observed on December 31.

Most of us follow the Western culture and celebrate New Year's Day on January 1. However, there are many other unique dates which are observed for celebrating New Year across the world.

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2. Chinese New Year

2. Chinese New Year
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Chinese New Year usually falls between Jan 21- Feb 21, depending on the occurrence of the new moon of the first lunar month. So, the date is not fixed. In 2017, the celebration will be observed on January 28. However, it is usually celebrated by dragon dances, fireworks, feasting and glowing lanterns.

3. Thai New Year

3. Thai New Year
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Thai New Year is also known as Songkran and is celebrated from April 13 - 15. The important activity in the celebration is throwing of water. The water is thrown in the hopes that it will bring good rains in the coming year. All Buddha statues are also cleansed for good luck and wealth.

4. Jewish New year

4. Jewish New year
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Rosh Hashanah is the another name of Jewish New Year. The celebration is observed in September and families celebrate the tradition through prayer and food services. People eat apples dipped in honey as a symbol of a sweet New Year.

5. Balinese New Year

5. Balinese New Year
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New Year in Bali is celebrated on 28 March, coinciding with their lunar New Year. Balinese celebrate the tradition by marking 12-hour dedicated silence and medication along with having yoga camps. Hence, it is 'Day of Silence' for all of them.

6. Ethiopian New Year

6. Ethiopian New Year
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It is also called as Enkutatash, meaning 'gift of jewels'. It is celebrated on 11 September (and if it is leap year then on 12 September). People take it as a spring festival and celebrate it with dancing, singing and other feasts and festivities.

7. Eastern Orthodox Church New Year

7. Eastern Orthodox Church New Year
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The Orthodox Church in Russia celebrates the New Year on January 14. This is considered as a religious holiday and is observed with family feasts. Although the religious holiday is marked on January 14 but the public holiday falls on January 1.

When do you celebrate New Year? Let us know.

Are you excited for New Year?