Ever Wondered Why We Fall Asleep In A Train Or Bus?

Do you sleep as soon as the bus starts?

Ever Wondered Why We Fall Asleep In A Train Or Bus?
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Does this happen with you as well? The moment you seat yourself in a train or bus, and it starts, you start feeling dizzy? And then you doze off as if extremely tired? The purring of the bus or train is all that your mind takes to fall asleep? Adults like you and me often fall prey to this. Do you everyday think of taking a resolution of not sleeping while commuting and doing some reading or listening music instead? However, failure kisses you as soon as you board your ride. This article may be of help to you.

There are so many questions we need answers to, but we are either too intimidated, time-crunched or embarrassed to actually ask. Here, we attempt to provide you with some explanations to the aforementioned subject.

Womb-like Effect

Womb-like Effect

A lot of research says that the rocking motion of the bus, train or car is just like a womb- warm, protected and cozy. That womb like feeling perhaps comes back. Moreover, if we feel comfortable and secure with the person who is driving then we fall asleep faster. Just like when a parent drives and the kid sleeps.

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Is this you?!

Is this you?!
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Aha! Does this happen to you often? Do you feel you are sleep deprived? Does it take only five minutes for your eyelids to get heavy? What is it about the train that lulls everyone to sleep? It could be the Sopite Syndrome. A neurological disorder that relates symptoms of fatigue, drowsiness, and mood changes after long periods of motion.

Explanation... when caught?

Explanation... when caught?
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This is what you try to do when you get caught sleeping? Don't worry, this happens to around 80% of the people commuting in the subways and buses.

Snapped! 

Snapped! 
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You may be sleep deprived and when you get into this particular environmental situation where you are relaxed and do not have to pay attention, you doze off. All is conducive to you, there is consistent sounds of motion, and no real safety threats. So falling asleep is easy.

Sleep deprived? Read on...

Sleep deprived? Read on...
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We have an accumulation of nerve chains called Adenosine when we are deprived of sleep. Adenosine is a consequence of cellular metabolism. Just like we eat and produce by-product, cells also do the same. So that's what happens-adenosine comes from that. 

Adenosine travels to our brain through blood, and we have adenosine receptor cells in the brain. When we have enough of them, we start to feel sleepier and sleepier. 

This can be a solution.

This can be a solution.
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Performing an activity such as standing or talking to someone keeps our brains working and not letting it sleep. 

Signs of sleep deprivation.

Signs of sleep deprivation.
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To check on sleep deprivation, do you hit the snooze button when you wake up in the morning? If yes, then you are probably not getting the right amount of sleep. And, if you wake up within five minutes after your alarm goes off, then guess what? You are getting the right amount of sleep.

Is it the rocking motion...

Is it the rocking motion...
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...in buses, trains or cars that make us go to sleep? Certainly so, because we don't fall asleep on a roller coaster. Because, as infants, we were made to sleep through this rocking motion only. 

Is White Noise the culprit?

Is White Noise the culprit?
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White Noise is a consistent noise that comes out evely across all hearable frequencies. It is the continous same noise that goes on. The hum of the tires running on the road, the general purr of the car and nearly no honking gives rise to white noise. This uninterrupted noise casts a spell on us, making us fast asleep. Moreover, most people love to sleep in a moving car than on bed. 

Do you fall asleep before the plane takes off?

Do you fall asleep before the plane takes off?
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Here's why. You fall asleep before an airplane takes off because of the re-circulated oxygen. It's actually an increase in the carbon dioxide content because of close proximities of the bodies with each other. With an increase in the carbon dioxide content, your brain is starving of oxygen and thus, slowing down. Finally, going to sleep.

Stay tuned to learn more from our 'Ever wondered' series. Post your questions in the comments section below, we would be glad to search answers to your questions. Please like and share.