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Humans, Mars As A Backup Planet Is Not Really A Great Idea!

Red planet may have possibilities of life, but, you can't depend on one single 'ice ball' for your future habitat, right?

Where do we come from? Any idea? Confused? If yes, you're moving on the right track. After all, confusion is the best tool when you decide to grow. 

While life is everywhere, absolutely everywhere on Earth, there is much debate about its origin. Let's take you approximately 4.1 to 3.8 billion years back, when the fierce war was going on between the existence of the planets. In this case, we can say that past reveals the future of our present.

At the beginning of the solar system, it is believed that the two planets experienced a period of intense bombardment by giants meteors, asteroids, comets and kept throwing rocks at each other for a long time. So apparently, the two planets may have been seeded by the same material, right? This is why Mars is very special to us.

Mars! It's an only planet we humans have been eyeing with intent since we entered to explore the universe. Even moon can host life but still our primary focus always remains on 'red planet.'

Let's take a deep dig into this matter and try to understand why Mars as a backup planet isn't a good idea for future habitats?

Humans, Mars As A Backup Planet Is Not Really A Great Idea!

Humans, Mars As A Backup Planet Is Not Really A Great Idea!

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We are the only advanced civilization in the solar system.

We are the only advanced civilization in the solar system.

...But, that doesn't mean there is no possibility of life nearby our planet.

Mars shows signs of having water in liquid form.

Mars shows signs of having water in liquid form.

A primitive ocean can be seen on Mars; it has several volcanoes and lakes but who can take guarantee that if we go there, life would be easier than before?

Does Mars have enough oxygen to support a large colony?

Does Mars have enough oxygen to support a large colony?

The atmosphere on Mars has less than 0.2% oxygen, while carbon dioxide constitutes other 96%. You couldn't hold your breath on Mars for very long time. If you try to breathe in the atmosphere of Mars, it would cause severe suffocation and then death. (If no precaution is taken)

Mars is very special to us! But...

Mars is very special to us! But...

It would be a mistake to think that Mars is the only planet in the solar system that is having a potential of microbial life.

The more you look for similar planets like Earth, the more you start respecting our planet.

The more you look for similar planets like Earth, the more you start respecting our planet.

In search of future earth, we're losing the planet we call home. Our planet is suffering a lot under the weight of so-called 'humanity.'

2014 ranks as Earth's warmest year since temperature record-keeping began in 1880.

2014 ranks as Earth's warmest year since temperature record-keeping began in 1880.

Glaciers or more commonly known as the frozen ocean water has been with us for millennia, but now they're disappearing, and it is a serious matter to be a concern of.

Before colonizing Mars, shouldn't we colonize the deserts of the earth?

Before colonizing Mars, shouldn't we colonize the deserts of the earth?

We have not colonized the desert of our planet. How can we even think of Mars which is made of a thick layer of oxidized iron dust and rocks?

Lucianne Walkowicz is an Astronomer at the Adler Planetarium, Chicago, United States

Lucianne Walkowicz is an Astronomer at the Adler Planetarium, Chicago, United States

Mars will be there to save us from the self-inflicted destruction of the only truly habitable planet we know of-the Earth. "As much as I love interplanetary exploration, I profoundly disagree with this idea," she continued. "There are many excellent reasons to go to Mars, but for anyone to tell you that Mars will be there to back up humanity is like the captain of the Titanic telling you the real party is happening later on the lifeboats," says Lucianne Walkowicz, an astronomer who works on NASA's Kepler mission.

Do you think the Red Planet is the only option we have?

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