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This Rhino Baby Repeats History After 128 Years 

This is a living breathing miracle!

This Rhino Baby Repeats History After 128 Years 
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In May 2016, an adorable baby rhino born in captivity in Indonesia grabbed the attention of the internet all over the world. This rhino baby is not less than a living breathing miracle as she is only the second of her kind born in 128 years. Sumatran rhino named Ratu is the mother of the beautiful female calf who gave birth to her brother Andatu in 2012.  

Read on for more details and pictures of the baby rhino.

Images via Flickr 

Recommended story: Can you guess which one of these endangered species can save lives of the other three?

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A happy announcement!

A happy announcement!

Four months back, the International Rhino Foundation happily announced the birth of a sweet rhino baby in Indonesia. Ratu is a 14-year-old rhino who gave birth to two solitary animals without any complications. 

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Sumatran rhinos are the most endangered large mammal on the planet. 

Sumatran rhinos are the most endangered large mammal on the
planet. 

Dr. Susie Ellis, Executive Director, IRF, explained, "Sumatran rhinos were just declared extinct in the wild in Malaysia, and now exist only in Indonesia. Ratu's calf has just increased the population by one percent– while this won't save the species, it's one more Sumatran rhino on the earth." 

According to the staff at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Ratu is a loving and caring mom. 

According to the staff at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Ratu is a loving and caring mom. 

Just after giving birth, Ratu sat at her baby's side, making sure the baby was alright. Dr. Ellis added, "Before she had her first calf, she was the feistiest and most difficult rhino at the facility. As soon as she had Andatu, she calmed down – even so much that the keepers were able to safely enter her pen, which they had not been able to do previously. With this new baby, she again has become very calm – and of course, she is a very attentive mother." 

Sumatran rhinos are solitary in nature.

Sumatran rhinos are solitary in nature.

Dr. Ellis further said, "Andatu will likely not have the chance to spend time with his sister. In the wild, his mom would already have kicked him out of her territory." 

There are less than 100 of these rhinos left in the world.  

There are less than 100 of these rhinos left in the world.  

Rhinoceros are an endangered species of animals and rarely breed in captivity these days. 

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Sumatran rhinos are decreasing in number due to poaching and small distributed population.

Sumatran rhinos are decreasing in number due to poaching and small distributed population.

Agriculture and mining are the key reasons due to which rhinos remain isolated from one another which in turn hamper their breeding. 

There are Rhino Protection Units (RPUs) in national parks on Sumatra. 

There are Rhino Protection Units (RPUs) in national parks on
Sumatra. 

These units spent 15 days out of every month in patrolling, monitoring, and deactivating snares of rhinos. 

Ratu's beautiful calves have created hope for the struggling generation of rhinos. 

Ratu’s beautiful calves have created hope for the struggling
generation of rhinos. 
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