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Book Review: Entrepreneurial Nation: Why Manufacturing Is Still Key To America's Future

During 2012 Presidential election campaign, 'jobs, jobs, jobs' was one abiding rallying cry from both the candidates. With the inclination of unemployment in the US wavering around 8%, the gist was how to put people back to work. Meet Ro Khanna, a former Deputy Assistant to the US Department of Commerce under the Obama administration, who strongly advocates the fact that US manufacturing is one fundamental aspect that will promote the employment strategies and the general welfare of the country. His book, Entrepreneurial Nation: Why Manufacturing is Still A Key To America's Future, dredges into the state of manufacturing in the US at present, why is manufacturing a cornerstone of the future of the United States, and what policies the country should target for to reinforce the manufacturing sector.

Ro Khanna exemplifies his premises by using real world manufacturing case instances from his time as a Deputy Assistant.

You can purchase this book HERE.

Book Review: Entrepreneurial Nation: Why Manufacturing Is Still Key To America's Future

Book Review: Entrepreneurial Nation: Why Manufacturing Is Still Key To America's Future

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About the author:

About the author:

Rohit "Ro" Khanna is an American teacher, lawyer, and politician. He served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the United States Department of Commerce under President Barack Obama. Khanna was a student at the University of Chicago, Yale Law School. Khanna is a member of the Democratic Party and is currently running for the United States House of Representatives in California's 17th Congressional District.

Let's admit it, the manufacturing sector in the US has been in declivity, which of course, led to the steady downfall in the percentage of GDP in the country.

Book Review: Entrepreneurial Nation

Khanna highlights his general inclination with some hard figures and facts, including this statement:

 "Manufacturing is no longer as significant a share of our economy as it once was, declining from nearly 28 percent of our GDP in the late 1940s after World War II to about 11 percent. We now devote less of our GDP to manufacturing than every other industrial nation except France."


It's quite apparent that manufacturing is not as fundamentally a large part of the US economy, as once it was. 

It’s quite apparent that manufacturing is not as fundamentally a large part of the US economy, as once it was. 

But, here's the real question, should it be? Should this aspect of 'Once upon a time, the manufacturing sector was the only crux of the nation's economy', be brought back to light and be endured for eternity? It's worth reminiscing that the country has withstood structural changes to the economy before. There was a time when agriculture predominated the economy, yet now it has been faded substantially in the form of the percentage of GDP.

On that note, Khanna introduces two remarkable economists – Robert Riech and Jagdish Bhagwati, who believe that the US should focus more on the service sector rather than manufacturing, which has become obsolescent. Khanna contradicted the statement and frames his notions in favor of manufacturing through the following premises:

1. Manufacturing is crucial to alleviate the US large trade deficit. The key is to export more, and import less.

1. Manufacturing is crucial to alleviate the US large trade deficit. The key is to export more, and import less.

2. Manufacturing evokes a demand for good paying jobs that requires skilled workers and the US cannot capitulate these positions to other countries.

2. Manufacturing evokes a demand for good paying jobs that requires skilled workers and the US cannot capitulate these positions to other countries.

3. Manufacturing is a fundamental part of insulating our national security. A strong military with avant-garde technology can only be possessed with a strong industrial base.

3. Manufacturing is a fundamental part of insulating our national security. A strong military with avant-garde technology can only be possessed with a strong industrial base.

4. The manufacturing sector in the US in natively high in terms of quality and quantity with specialized customer service. There calls for a need of burgeoning and shielding this global edge.

4. The manufacturing sector in the US in natively high in terms of quality and quantity with specialized customer service. There calls for a need of burgeoning and shielding this global edge.

Khanna makes a fascinating argument for the emphasis on manufacturing. Albeit, the argument bolsters the entire book, he quickly diverts his notions to more 'objective' concrete policy proposals to persevere the US manufacturing.

Khanna makes a fascinating argument for the emphasis on manufacturing. Albeit, the argument bolsters the entire book, he quickly diverts his notions to more ‘objective’ concrete policy proposals to persevere the US manufacturing.

The lion's share of 'Entrepreneurial Nation' is an expedition of the current panorama of the manufacturing in the US with Khanna as a tour guide. 

The lion’s share of 'Entrepreneurial Nation' is an expedition of the current panorama of the manufacturing in the US with Khanna as a tour guide. 

The reader is taken to places like Wichita, Kansas, the Air Capital of the World, to create an instance in reader's mind of a haywire clump of manufacturing. Through this tour of manufacturing, the reader will notice how specific companies have flourished in the global marketplace and their anxieties of the future of manufacturing in the US. Each chapter in the book also showcases a policy endorsement that Khanna postulates would abet manufacturing in the US.

The policy agenda in 'Entrepreneurial Nation' is sweeping and pervasive. He discusses everything from fair trade (with China as the main felon) to tax reform to closing the discerned skills gap of the US worker.

The policy agenda in 'Entrepreneurial Nation' is sweeping and pervasive. He discusses everything from fair trade (with China as the main felon) to tax reform to closing the discerned skills gap of the US worker.

So many policy agendas are offered that it's unreasonable to not dodge with some specific planks, whether it's an assertion or a solution. However, avoid getting the hang of the trivialities, 'Entrepreneurial Nation' is a dauntless and a widespread vision for the future of American manufacturing and its status in the US economy. Khanna did a tremendous job of bringing forth the challenges that manufacturers confront and the triumphs they have accomplished.

Any person that is sympathetic in the state of manufacturing and the policies that govern manufacturing would be thoughtful to start with Entrepreneurial Nation: Why Manufacturing is Still Key To America's Future. 

WittyFeed's Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.

What you want the USA to focus on, manufacturing sector or service sector?

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