Share this post

user icon

Live

People Reading

This story now

10 Common British Slangs That Americans Just Can't Digest

Is it autumn season or fall? Is it ground floor or first floor? Is it spelled humour or humor? I can go on and on about the differences in British English and American English.

Though both countries technically speak the same language but there are many differences which you just can't get without Googling about them.

"Have you got time?" In some parts of America, this means, "What time is it now?" Kind of strange for a person who's not from the USA. Same thing happens with Americans when they go to Britain and get to hear their slangs.

Well, here are some British slangs which will make you scratch your head.

Recommended Story: 10 Hilarious Instances When Indians Murdered English

10 Common British Slangs That Americans Just Can't Digest

10 Common British Slangs That Americans Just Can't Digest

754 396
  in Lifestyle

1. "Bob's your uncle"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

There's no way you can guess what it means. This British slang is similar to Americans saying, "Ta-da!" It's like you cook the dinner before your girlfriend reaches home and you present the food to her with a Ta-da!

P.s: There's no relation between this slang and uncle Bob.

2. "Knees up"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

You might have got the basic idea from the picture above. Yeah, your guess is right, this means 'party.'

Let's have knees up guys! Does it sound good?

3. "Chin wag"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

Chin wag means talking to someone in a gossipy manner. It surely doesn't mean wagging your chin.

But what if my dog wags his chin? Does that qualify for chin wag?

4. "Get stuffed"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

It's not remotely related to eating anything. It is used instead of "Fuck-off". It's like when your boss is yelling at you and you just say to him, "go get stuffed." I guess, if your boss is British or have read this article, you're fired for sure.

Though it is unclear what are we stuffing and where?

Also, on an entirely unrelated note, do you know British says arse instead of ass.

5. "A total cock up"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

A total cock up means when you fuck up at a job very badly. By the way, this slang has no relation with boy chicken and also with *ahem ahem*.

6. "Nice one"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

Well, Americans use it in a sarcastic tone whereas British use it for a compliment. 

7. "I'm chuffed to bits"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

British use it instead of, "I'm pleased with what's happened."

P.s: Chuffed is also a British slang for "farted."

8. "I'm not being funny but..."

8.

It is a softened way of complaining about something. If you get to hear this slang, remember, the person in front of you is not trying to be funny at all.

9. "I've got the hump"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

It is a beautiful British way of saying, "I'm annoyed a little."  

10 "The dog's bullocks"

British Slangs That Differ From Americans

Bullshit! You have to add this slang also. Yeah, this is British synonym for bullshit. And, don't stare too much at the picture, your dog might get offended.

That's all folks. Goodbye.

Loved this? Spread it out then

comments Comment ()

Post as @guest useror
clear

clear
arrow_back

redo Pooja query_builder {{childComment.timeAgo}}

clear

clear
arrow_back

Be the first to comment on this story.

Report

close

Select you are Reporting

expand_more
  • +2351 Active user
Post as @guest useror

NSFW Content Ahead

To access this content, confirm your age by signing up.