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Ever Wondered How X-Ray Machines Work? The Answer Will Make You Scratch Your Head

Ever Wondered How X-Ray Machines Work? The Answer Will Make You Scratch Your Head
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The discovery of the X-rays in 1895 was the beginning of a revolutionary change in our understanding of the physical world. Within a few years, X-rays became a valued diagnostic tool of the physicians worldwide. And since their use, they have been very efficient in nursing numerous perilous diseases and also for many non-medical purposes.

Here are a few vintage photographs of how have X-rays been in operation over the years.

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The earliest technology.

How X-Ray Machines Work

A man receiving an X-ray in Austria, Circa 1910.

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At the radiologist exhibition.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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The picture is taken at the radiologist exhibition, 1934. The latest X-ray apparatus is being operated by a radiologist wearing the old-type protectors which are no longer necessary with modern equipment.

The oldest chest X-ray.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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A chest X-ray in progress at Professor Menard's radiology department at the Cochin Hospital, Paris, 1914.

For the panoramic picture of teeth.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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The photograph depicts an X-ray machine which circles the head to take panoramic picture of teeth, eliminating usual mouthful of film, 1960.

For improved dental examination.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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X-ray machine at the California Dental Association exhibit, California state fair, 1953.

At the World War II.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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An X-ray technician with the US Medical Corps tending to a wounded soldier during the World War II, Circa 1941-1945.

With the "Cooks Tube."

How X-Ray Machines Work
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Taking an X-ray image with the early apparatus "Cooks Tube," 1800. The standing man is viewing his hand with a fluoroscope screen. No precautions against the radiation exposure are taken as its hazards were not known at that time.

The further advancement.

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A male technician is taking an X-ray of a female patient in 1940. This image was used to argue that the radiation exposure during the X-ray procedure would be negligible.

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With the latest apparatus.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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An X-ray demonstration with the latest X-ray apparatus in London, 1932.

With the "Look Through" machine.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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At the Roentgen Institute, the modern Roentgen "Look Through" machine, which prevents any injury to the treating physician, Frankfurt, Germany, Circa 1929.

To insert the "Venous Catheter."

How X-Ray Machines Work
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Doctors using the X-ray machine to feed "Venous Catheter" into the patient's heart, 1947. Venous Catheter is used to supply food, fluids and medicines into the patient's body for a prolonged period.

For the advanced chest X-ray.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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A small child being given chest X-ray at Chelsea Chest Clinic, 1949.

The emergence of the radiograph.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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In October 1937, Rio de Janeiro, a radiograph invented by professor physicist Moraes De Abreu to detect lung diseases, called Roentgen-Photography was used on a patient.

With the shock-proof apparatus.

How X-Ray Machines Work
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A woman is having her head X-rayed with the new shock-proof apparatus at the London Medical Exhibition, Royal Horticultural Hall. The device designed for the consulting room was simple to use as it could be plugged into any domestic lighting point, 1934.

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