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11 Critically Endangered Species On This Planet 

Before it's too late, you should know what to do. 

May 20 marks the date for the International Endangered Species Day celebration, where information dissemination, paying tribute and re-echoing our environment-oriented call of action for wildlife conservation, environmental activism, and related issues are raised and forwarded all over the world. 

Historically, the celebration was first held by the United States Congress in 2006. Every 3rd Friday of May (well, actually within the whole month), there are exhibits, talks, tours, and other activities were utilized as means to reiterate the importance of maintaining biodiversity, and acting upon dying creatures we must conserve for future generations. 

Before the celebration, or this month ends, you must at least take part in these advocacies and formations, because there should be this mentality that we are responsible for what we will see in the years, decades and centuries to come. Remember that nature is today's generation's debt from the future societies--our sons, daughters, grandchildren, and so on. 

So, before it's too late, we must stand for what is right--let's push for a conducive habitat for every organism on this planet. To start over, we must know who we must prioritize. That's why, we prepared this list of critically endangered species calling for peace, contentment, habitat, and harmony. 

Read this, and be part of the advocacy! We deserve better. 

11 Critically Endangered Species On This Planet 

11 Critically Endangered Species On This Planet 

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1. Yangzte Finless Porpoise 

1. Yangzte Finless Porpoise 

With scientific name Neophocaena asiaeorientalis ssp. asiaeorientalis, Yangtze Finless Porpoise is a marine mammal found in Yangtze River, China that was also a home to the Baiji Dolphin--which was already marked as extinct in 2006 due to pollution and other anthropogenic activities. This finless porpoise exhibits an acclaimed intelligence that can be compared to a gorilla, and a charming smile you would not forget in your lifetime. 

2. Saola 

2. Saola 

Saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) is a mammal that originates from Vietnam, with up to 20-inches of a parallel horn for both males and females, and appears like an antelope, but is more related to cattle. It was one of the relatively most recent mammal ever discovered (1992). 

3. Pangolin

3. Pangolin

Pangolins, with a total of eight species found in Asia and Africa, are known as that fully-armored scaly animal that can roll over with grace. Their scales located at their tails can lash out predators or enemies. Two of eight Pangolin species are listed in the Red List of Threatened Species by IUCN.

4. Leatherback Turtle

4. Leatherback Turtle

Scientifically named as Dermochelys coriacea, Leatherback turtles are basically migratory turtles with leather-like shells. Of all the sea turtle species all over the world, this creature was recorded as the biggest. Although large in physical size, their numbers are decreasing almost exponentially. 

5. Cross River Gorilla

5. Cross River Gorilla

Gorilla gorilla diehli, or commonly know as Cross River Gorilla is not that different to the western lowland gorilla, but have minor differences in anatomical specifications (tooth and skull). More so, the said species experience the same threats to their existence, such as compromising human settlements, poaching, forest clearing and the likes. This subspecies of western lowland gorilla are situated in the Nigerian region.

6. Hawksbill Turtle

6. Hawksbill Turtle

Scientific name: Eretmochelys imbricata. Hawksbill Turtle contains long, pointed beak, with patterned overlapping scales along its shells. It plays an important role in ecological balance, as it feeds on sea anemones, sponges and jellyfish, that help in regulating coral reefs and grass sea beds. Unfortunately, they are at risk of extinction because they are shamelessly abducted to be sold in the black market (for their shells with 'high market value'). 

7. Black Rhino 

7. Black Rhino 

Black Rhino, or Diceros bicornis, is a species of rhinoceros found in the African continent. Their unfortunate story is not that new for us, but their struggle remains rampant. Black rhinos have threats from poachers--for their horns, other species--competition and natural selection, and climate change. 

8. Amur Leopard 

8. Amur Leopard 

At the far eastern region in Russia (Amur Heilong), Amur Leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) can be found. With a running speed that is half as fast as the cheetah (37 miles per hour), and horizontal and vertical leaps of at most 19ft. and 10ft. respectively, they cannot run from their greatest killer--extinction. Ideally, this species can get away from its fast decline, as soon as forest exploitation, poaching (of species and it's prey), inbreeding, forest fires, and road infrastructures are stopped, if not, be strictly implemented.  

9. Sumatran Elephant

9. Sumatran Elephant

Known with a binomial nomenclature Elephas maximus sumatranus, the Sumatran Elephant is a herbivore found in Borneo and Sumatra, Island of Indonesia. For the 75 years, the species population declined by at least 80%, and this was triggered by habitat loss, fragmentation, and illegal poaching. They may grow as high as 10.5 ft, and can weigh as heavy as 8,000 pounds, but there's nothing heavier than being at the brink of extinction. It's high time for Sumatran elephants to be looked up as worthy of surviving. 

10. Vaquita

10. Vaquita

Vaquita (or "little cow" in Spanish) (Phocoena sinus), found in the Gulf of California, is regarded as the rarest marine mammal to date. This endemic porpoise has dark rings on its eyes, and gray-shaded skin, but the dark activities they're experiencing are pushing them to go extinct.

11. Sumatran Orangutan

11. Sumatran Orangutan

Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) is a species of orangutan found in Indonesia, and could be as high as 4.6 ft. These 'humans in the forest' have long faces, with pale red-colored hairs. Due to illegal logging, land conversion (from forest to farms), and the establishment of road infrastructure, their viable ecosystem degenerates and becomes less favorable for them.

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