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Felt Something Floating In Your Eyes Ever? Here's What It Is!

You might have noticed some strange little worm like things floating aimlessly in your field of vision. These annoying squishy little lines are known as 'floaters' and about 70% of the human population experiences them. Eye floaters can appear as black or gray dots, lines, cobwebs or blobs and while they might be a nuisance, eye floaters do not cause you any pain or discomfort. Most floaters are small and quickly move out of your field of vision.

And now when you are sure that these floaters are not a sign of alien invasion, let us try to learn more about them.

Images via TED Ed

Felt Something Floating In Your Eyes Ever? Here's What It Is!

Felt Something Floating In Your Eyes Ever? Here's What It Is!

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These floaters usually appear as transparent circles or tadpoles and stay permanently in your eye.

These floaters usually appear as transparent circles or tadpoles and stay permanently in your eye.

Floaters are particularly pronounced if you gaze at something particularly bright, such as a piece of white paper or a blue sky. 

Floaters are particularly pronounced if you gaze at something particularly bright, such as a piece of white paper or a blue sky. 

You'll notice that they move as your eyes move and appear to zoom across your eye as you try to look at them directly.

Apparently, floaters are not what they are officially called. 

Apparently, floaters are not what they are officially called. 

The correct term is muscae volitantes, Latin for Flying Flies. But don't worry. They are not flies, bugs or any living thing at all.

Muscae volitantes are made up of tissue, red blood cells, or protein.

Muscae volitantes are made up of tissue, red blood cells, or protein.

These small chunks are seen when they move near the back of the eye where the retina is located.

These small chunks are seen when they move near the back of the eye where the retina is located.

We don't see the floaters themselves, but the shadow they make on the retina.

We don't see the floaters themselves, but the shadow they make on the retina.

It's called 'Blue Field Entoptic Phenomenon'

It's called 'Blue Field Entoptic Phenomenon'

Red blood cells absorb blue light, effectively casting a shadow on the retina and this effect is known as the "blue field entoptic phenomenon". Meet the culprit behind those strange floaters!

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