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This Google Device Saved An Infant's Life Proving Technology Isn't A Curse Afterall

Doctors at Florida hospital used a $20 virtual reality device to save the life of an infant who was born with defects in her heart and lungs back in August. Teegan Lexcen was born with one lung and her left heart almost missing. Cassidy and Chad Lexcen, the child's parents were told by the doctors in minnesota that there was nothing they could do to save her. And then, this happened-

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This Google Device Saved An Infant's Life Proving Technology Isn't A Curse Afterall

This Google Device Saved An Infant's Life Proving Technology Isn't A Curse Afterall

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The doctors had given up on her

The doctors had given up on her

The doctors in Minnesota sent the child home, along with a hospice nurse and said there wasn't anything they could possibly do to keep her.

But, she lived another two months

But, she lived another two months

She survived another two months and then her parents thought about taking a second opinion. When Chad's sister sent him an article that listed the 20 most innovative pediatric surgeons alive today, Dr Redmond Burke, the chief of cardiovascular surgery at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in Miami was one of them.

His sister reached to the doctor on number three

His sister reached to the doctor on number three

And they heard about it immediately in the wake of the emergency of the situation. Her images and medical records were sent to them after the nurse asked for those.

Time was of the essence

Time was of the essence

"I felt like we were racing against the clock", Cassidy told CNN.

Burke and his team met and discussed patients

Burke and his team met and discussed patients

Burke met his team of 30 cardiac doctors at the hospital thrice a week and discussed their patients and people who could become their patients. When they looked at Teegan's images, they knew they had never seen anything of that sort.

No definitive plan

No definitive plan

Burke told CNN that he asked Dr Juan Carlos Muniz, a pediatric cardiologist who specializes in imaging, to make a 3-D model of Teegan's heart. Because it had helped in previous complicated cases in the past, it seemed like an option.

The 3D printer was broken

The 3D printer was broken

However, Muniz reported a while later that their 3D printer was broken. Then, he chatted with Dr. David Ezon, a pediatric cardiologist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, about using virtual reality for children's hearts.

They then purchased a Google cardboard

They then purchased a Google cardboard

With the use of the Google, Burke was able to observe the images more closely and tried to come up with a solution. Her heart was to the left and the solution was to make a midline incision plus another cut going from the center of her chest all the way to the left side.

She had been slowly dwindling away

She had been slowly dwindling away

"She was dwindling away. She'd been slowly dying for three months," he added to CNN. Thanks to the Google Cardboard, because the virtual images it produced allowed Burke to fathom a way to do the usual normal midline incision and spare her the additional cut. Burke devised a new pattern of surgery, staying up all night and the surgery was successful.Four weeks after the surgery, Teegan is about to return home with a happy heart.

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